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Kew provides a unique setting in which to study the phenology of flowering plants. The weather at Kew has been recorded for over two centuries, and its collections of exotic and native plants are among the most diverse in the world.

In 2000 a new initiative called Kew 100 began with the aim of recording annually the first-flowering and mid-flowering dates of 100 plants in the Gardens in perpetuity. The range of plants chosen comprises native plants such as Meadow Saxifrage and Cow Parsley, naturalised introduced species like the Bluebell and many exotic species from the collections such as Egyptian Willow and Star Magnolia. It spans trees, shrubs, perennials and bulbs providing a representative selection of the outdoor plants that grow at Kew.

For Kew 100 data select a plant name from the list below and click 'View Record' to view it's flowering dates

 

The Kew 100 data is already proving very interesting. Comparison of the 2001 results with those from 2002 shows that flowering in the relatively warm spring of 2002 has been much earlier than in the cold wet months at the beginning of the previous year. In some species the trend has continued in 2003 but not in all, as different plants respond in different ways to their environment. These three years of results give a fascinating insight into the ways in which flowering is influenced by the weather but it will take much longer to distinguish the trends caused by climate change.

A wealth of historical phenology records also exist. Select a plant name, (all include ten flowering dates or more) and click 'View Record' to see corresponding data:

 

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